Here at M3D safety is a big deal so we want to share our safety knowledge with you so that you can make safety a big deal in your classroom. While 3D printers are amazing machines, at the end of the day they are still machines. As with all machines, a culture of safety is the most important way of preventing injuries to both property and people.

Please review this safety page thoroughly in order to ensure your classroom is set up in the best possible way.

 

CLASSROOM SETUP

 

In our experience, younger students want to touch the 3D printer while it's moving while older students are more likely to damage the machine by experimenting on it. For this reason, we have a few different classroom layout suggestions for you that can help keep your students and 3D printers safe.

 

Scroll through 5 possible layouts below.

The Single Wall

Student to printer ratio range: from 5 : 1 to 35 : 1

PROS

Keeps the printers centralized

Can run all printers with 1-2 laptops

Teacher can control access

Damage from misuse is minimized

Easy to ventilate if placed below windows

Can use a single outlet

CONS

Printing takes a while, students would need to wait between turns.

If a printer breaks, the classroom potential is significantly reduced

Students rarely get 1 on 1 time with the printer

Students need to work in designated areas

The Island

Student to printer ratio range: from 6 : 1 to 35 : 1

PROS

Keeps the printers centralized

Can run all printers with 1-2 laptops

Teacher can control access

Damage from misuse is minimized

Classroom has multi-use

Close to wall outlets

CONS

Printing takes a while, students would need to wait between turns.

If a printer breaks, the classroom potential is significantly reduced

Students rarely get 1 on 1 time with the printer

Students need to work in designated areas

The Semi-Circle

Student to printer ratio range: from 2 : 1 to 7 : 1.

PROS

Improved printer to student ratio

High visibility from teacher to each printer

If a printer breaks the class is minimally impacted

Students get more 1 on 1 time with the printer

Easy to ventilate if placed below windows

Close to wall outlets

CONS

You would need 10-15 laptops to run the printers.

Classroom is not multiuse

High risk of printer misuse or damage

Teacher and students do not have access to all sides of the printer

Classroom may need multiple fire extinguishers

The Boardroom

Student to printer ratio range: from 1 : 1 to 4 : 1.

PROS

Improved printer to student ratio

High visibility from teacher to each printer

If a printer breaks the class is minimally impacted

Students get more 1 on 1 time with the printer

Teacher and students have access to all sides of the printer

Easier to reference a single printer to other students

CONS

You would need 10-15 laptops to run the printers.

Classroom is not multiuse

High risk of printer misuse or damage

May create a ventilation issue

You will need to run power to the middle of the room

The Multi Island

Student to printer ratio range: from 1 : 1 to 2 : 1.

PROS

Improved printer to student ratio

If a printer breaks the class is minimally impacted

Students get more 1 on 1 time with the printer

Teacher and students have access to all sides of the printer

CONS

You would need 10-15 laptops to run the printers.

Classroom is not multiuse

High risk of printer misuse or damage

Teacher has low visibility of printers

Classroom may need multiple fire extinguishers

You will need to run power to the middle of the room

     

POWER

 

As the number and size of the 3D printers in your classroom increase, you will need to consider the most efficient way to power them all. M3D products are very energy-efficient, with our largest printer using only 400 watts. To compare these to general household electronics, an average hair dryer on high heat will use 1,000-1,500 watts. Most wall outlets can handle 1800 watts. See below for printer specific recommendations.

A Micro+ draws 20 watts without a heated bed, or 40 watts with one. Filling a classroom with Micro+'s should not cause any power issues, we recommend no more than 20 Micro+ per outlet.

A Pro will use approximately 45 watts. Filling a classroom with Pro's should not cause any power issues, we recommend no more than 10 Pro's per outlet.

A Crane will use about 240 watts. Filling a classroom with Crane's could cause power issues. We recommend no more than 5 Crane's per outlet.

A Promega will use roughly 400 watts. Filling a classroom with Promega's will cause power issues. Special care should be taken to ensure all local power regulations are followed. We recommend no more than 3 Promega's per outlet.

 

VENTILATION

 

All M3D 3D printers are what is called a FDM 3D printer, which stands for fused deposition modeling. FDM 3D printers work by heating thermoplastics to their melting point, extruding them in a controlled manner, and then rapidly cooling them. In this process, materials offgas as well as release microparticles. M3D highly recommends using 3D printers in well ventilated areas or purchasing printers that come with an enclosure and hepa filter.

Please see the Material Safety Data Sheet section below for more details about each filament material.

 

FIRE SAFETY

 

We designed our products with numerous safety features. For example, our products were designed to shutdown rather than continue to operate in conditions that could potentially lead to a fire. All of our products have been rigorously tested by third party safety certification labs to ensure that they are safe in homes all over the world and pose no danger to their owners if the products are operated in a safe manner. M3D printers heat up thermoplastics to their melting points between 200-350 C. If the 3D printer is operated in an unsafe manner, the system temperatures are ser too high for a chosen material, or the 3D printer gets damaged, a fire could occur. The likelihood of this event is extremely low, however, we recommed that any classroom containing a 3D printer have at least one class E fire extinguisher for every 10 printers.

 

FIRST AID

 

3D printing can lead to several different types of injuries so we recommend having a first aid kit in every classroom. The most common injuries that may occur are cuts and burns.

Cuts may occur when removing prints from the print surface with a metal or plastic spatula. These print removal tools are often sharp and if used inappropriately could result in minor cuts and scrapes. Cuts can also occur when removing support structure from prints or while finishing prints. Please ensure this is all done carefully to minimize the risk of cuts.

Burns may occur if students touch the head of the 3D printer while it is heating up or printing. Please be extremely cautious anytime a 3D printer is functioning and ensure all hands are kept away from the extruder to minimize the risk of burns.

 

 

MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS

 

Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) contain important safety information about each of our 3D Inks: PLA, Chameleon, Tough, Tough 115A, ABS-R, ABS-R3, PVA, PVB, ASA, POM and Carbon Fiber.

 

 

If you have any questions, please email us at [email protected].